I recently had what I thought was a rather unique requirement from a customer.

The requirement was to build Azure IaaS virtual machines and have them joined to a managed domain, while also being able to authenticate to the virtual machines using Azure AD credentials.

The answer is Azure AD Domain Services!

Azure AD Domain Services provides managed domain services such as domain join, group policy and Kerberos/NTLM authentication without the need for you to deploy and  manage domain controllers in the cloud. For more information see https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/active-directory-domain-services/active-directory-ds-overview

It is not without its limitations though, main things to call out is that configuring domain trusts and applying schema extensions is not possible with Azure AD Domain Services. For a full list of limitations see: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/active-directory-domain-services/active-directory-ds-comparison

Unfortunately at this point in time you cannot use ARM templates to configure Azure AD Domain Services so you are limited to the Azure Portal or PowerShell. I am not going to bore you with the details of the deployment steps as it is quite simple and you can easily follow the steps supplied in the Microsoft documentation: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/active-directory-domain-services/active-directory-ds-enable-using-powershell

What I would like to do is point out the following learnings that I discovered during my deployment.

  1. In order to utilise Azure AD credentials that are synchronised from on-premises, synchronisation of NTLM/Kerberos credential hashes must be enabled in Azure AD Connect, this is not enabled by default.
  2. If there is any cloud-only user accounts, all users who need to use Azure AD Domain Services must change their passwords after Azure AD Domain Services is provisioned. The password change process causes the credential hashes for Kerberos and NTLM authentication to be generated in Azure AD.
  3. Once a cloud-only user account has changed their password, you will need to wait for a minimum of 20 minutes before you will be able to use Azure AD Domain Services (this got me as I was impatient).
  4. Speaking of patience the provisioning process of Azure Domain Services takes about an hour.
  5. Have a dedicated subnet for Azure AD Domain services to avoid any connectivity issues that may occur with NSGs/firewalls.
  6. You can only have one managed domain connected to your Azure Active Directory.

That’s it, hopefully this helped you get a better understanding of Azure AD Domain Services and assists with a smooth deployment.

Category:
Azure Infrastructure, Azure Platform
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Join the conversation! 2 Comments

  1. Thank you.very well explained

    Reply

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