Why are you not using Azure Resource Explorer (Preview)?

Originally posted on Lucian’s blog at clouduccino.com. Follow Lucian on Twitter @LucianFrango. Connect on LinkedIn.

***

For almost two years the Azure Resource Explorer has been in preview. For almost two years barely anyone has used it. This stops today!

I’ve been playing around with the Azure Portal (ARM) and clicking away stumbled upon the Azure Resource Explorer; available via https://resources.azure.com. Before you go any further, click on that or open the URI in a new tab in your favourite browser (I’m using Chrome 56.x for Mac if you were wondering) and finally BOOKMARK IT!

Okay, let’s pump the breaks and slow down now. I know what you’re probably thinking: “I’m not bookmarking a URI to some Azure service because some blogger dude told me to. This could be some additional service that won’t add any benefit since I have the Azure portal and PowerShell; love PowerShell”. Well, that is a fair point. However, let me twist your arm with the following blog post; full of fun facts and information about what Azure Resource Explorer is, what is does, how to use it and more!

What is Azure Resource Explorer

This is a [new to me] website, running Bootstrap HTML, CSS, Javascript framework (an older version, but, like yours truly here on clouduccino), that provides streamlined and rather well laid out access to various REST API details/calls for any given Azure subscription. You can login and view some nice management REST API’s, make changes to Azure infrastructure in your subscription via REST calls/actions like get, put, post, delete and create.

There’s some awesome resources around documentation for the different API’s, although Microsoft is lagging in actually making this of any use across the board (probably should not have mentioned that). Finally, what I find handy is pre-build PowerShell scripts that outline how to complete certain actions mixed in with the REST API’s.

Here’s an example of an application gateway in the ARE portal. Not that there is much to see, since there are no appGateways, but, I could easily create one!

Use cases

I’m sure that all looks “interesting”; with an example above with nothing to show for it. Well, here is where I get into a little more detail. I can’t show you all the best features straight away, otherwise you’ll probably go off and start playing with and tinkering with the Resource Explorer portal yourselves (go ahead and do that, but, after reading the remainder of this blog!).

Use case #1 – Quick access to information

Drilling through numerous blades in the Azure Portal, while it works well, sometimes can take longer than you want when all you need to do is check for one bit of information- say a route table for a VNET. PowerShell can also be time consuming- doing all that typing and memorising cmdlets and stuff (so 2016..).

A lot of the information you need can be grabbed at a glance from the ARE portal though which in turns saves you time. Here’s a quick screenshot of the route table (or lack there of) from a test VNET I have in the Kloud sandbox Azure subscription that most Kloudies use on the regular.

I know, I know. There is no routes. In this case it’s a pretty basic VNET, but, if I introduced peering and other goodness in Azure, it would all be visible at a glance here!

Use case #2 – Ahh… quick access to information?

Here’s another example where getting access to information configuration is really easy with ARE. If you’re working on a PowerShell script to provision some VM instances and you are not sure of the instance size you need, or the programatic name for that instance size, you can easily grab that information form the ARE portal. Bellow highlights a quick view of all the VM instance sizes available. There are 532 lines in that JSON output with all instance sizes from Standard_A0 to Standard_F16s (which offers 16 cores, 32GB of RAM and up to 32 disks attached if you were interested).

vmSizes view for all current available VM sizes in Azure. Handy to grab the programatic name to then use in PowerShell scripting?!

Use case #3 – PowerShell script examples

Mixing the REST API programatic cmdlets with PowerShell is easy. The ARE portal outlines the ways you can mix the two to execute quick cmdlets to various actions, for example: get, set, delete. Bellow is a an example set of PowerShell cmdlets from the ARE portal for VNET management.

Final words

Hopefully you get a chance to try out the Azure Resource Explorer today. It’s another handy tool to keep in your Azure Utility Belt. It’s definitely something I’m going to use, probably more often than I will probably realise.

#HappyFriday

Best,

Lucian

 

 

 

commands

How to configure a Graphical PowerShell Dev/Admin/Support User Interface for Azure/Office365/Microsoft Identity Manager

During the development of an identity management solution I find myself with multiple PowerShell/RDP sessions connected to multiple environments using different credentials often to obtain trivial data/information. It is easy to trip yourself up as well with remote powershell sessions to differing environments. If only there was a simple UI that could front-end a set of PowerShell modules and make those simple queries quick and painless. Likewise to allow support staff to execute a canned set of queries without providing them elevated permissions.

I figured someone would have already solved this problem and after some searching with the right keywords I found the powershell-command-executor-ui from bitsofinfo . Looking into it he had solved a lot of the issues with building a UI front-end for PowerShell with the powershell-command-executor and the stateful-process-command-proxy. That solution provided the framework for what I was thinking. The ability to provide a UI for PowerShell using powershell modules including remote powershell was exactly what I was after. And it was built on NodeJS and AngularJS so simple enough for some customization.

Introduction

In this blog post I’ll detail how I’ve leveraged the projects listed above for integration with;

Initially I had a vision of serving up the UI from an Azure WebApp. NodeJS on Azure WebApp’s is supported, however with all the solution dependencies I just couldn’t get it working.

My fallback was to then look to serve up the UI from a Windows Server 2016 Nano Server. I learnt from my efforts that a number of the PowerShell modules I was looking to provide a UI for, have .NET Framework dependencies. Nano Server does not have full .NET Framework support. Microsoft state to do so would mean the server would no longer be Nano.

For now I’ve deployed an Azure Windows Server 2016 Server secured by an Azure NSG to only allow my machine to access it. More on security later.

Overview

Simply, put the details in Github for the powershell-command-executor provide the architecture and integration. What I will detail is the modifications I’ve made to utilize the more recent AzureADPreview PowerShell Module over the MSOL PowerShell Module. I also updated the dependencies of the solution for the latest versions and hooked it into Microsoft Identity Manager. I also made a few changes to allow different credentials to be used for Azure and Microsoft Identity Manager.

Getting Started

I highly recommend you start with your implementation on a local development workstation/development virtual machine. When you have a working version you’re happy with you can then look at other ways of presenting and securing it.

NodeJS

NodeJS is the webserver for this solution. Download NodeJS for your Windows host here. I’m using the 64-bit version, but have also implemented the solution on 32-bit. Install NodeJS on your local development workstation/development virtual machine.

You can accept all the defaults.

Following the installation of NodeJS download the powershell-command-executor-ui from GitHub. Select Clone 0r Download, Download ZIP and save it to your machine.

Right click the download when it has finished and select Extract All. Select Browse and create a folder at the root of C:\ named nodejs. Extract powershell-command-executor-ui.

Locate the c:\nodejs\powershell-command-executor-ui-master\package.json file.

Using an editor such as Notepad++ update the package.json file ……

…… so that it looks like the following. This will utilise the latest versions of the dependencies for the solution.

From an elevated (Administrator) command prompt in the c:\nodejs\powershell-command-executor-ui-master directory run “c:\program files\nodejs npm” installThis will read the package.json file you edited and download the dependencies for the solution.

You can see in the screenshot below NodeJS has downloaded all the items in package.json including the powershell-command-executor and stateful-process-command-proxy.

When you now list the directories under C:\nodejs\powershell-command-executor-ui-master\node_modules you will see those packages and all their dependencies.

We can now test that we have a working PowerShell UI NodeJS website. From an elevated command prompt whilst still in the c:\nodejs\powershell-command-executor-ui-master directory run “c:\Program Files\nodejs\node.exe” bin\www

Open a browser on the same host and go to http://localhost:3000”. You should see the default UI.

Configuration and Customization

Now it is time to configure and customize the PowerShell UI for our needs.

The files we are going to edit are:

  • C:\nodejs\powershell-command-executor-ui-master\routes\index.js
    • Update Paths to the encrypted credentials files used to connect to Azure, MIM. We’ll create the encrypted credentials files soon.
  • C:\nodejs\powershell-command-executor-ui-master\public\console.html
    • Update for your customizations for CSS etc.
  • C:\nodejs\powershell-command-executor-ui-master\node_modules\powershell-command-executor\O365Utils.js
    • Update for PowerShell Modules to Import
    • Update for Commands to make available in the UI

We also need to get a couple of PowerShell Modules installed on the host so they are available to the site. The two I’m using I’ve mentioned earlier. With WMF5 intalled using Powershell we can simply install them as per the commands below.

Install-Module AzureADPreview
Install-Module LithnetRMA

In order to connect to our Microsoft Identity Manager Synchronization Server we are going to need to enable Remote Powershell on our Microsoft Identity Manager Synchronization Server. This post I wrote here details all the setup tasks to make that work. Test that you can connect via RPS to your MIM Sync Server before updating the scripts below.

Likewise for the Microsoft Identity Manager Service Server. Make sure after installing the LithnetRMA Powershell Module you can connect to the MIM Service using something similar to:

# Import LithnetRMA PS Module
import-module lithnetrma

# MIM AD User Admin
$username = "mimadmin@mim.mydomain.com"
# Password 
$password = "Secr3tSq1rr3l!" | convertto-securestring -AsPlainText -Force
# PS Creds
$credentials = New-Object System.Management.Automation.PSCredential $Username,$password

# Connect to the FIM service instance
# Will require an inbound rule for TCP 5725 (or your MIM Service Server Port) in you Resource Group Network Security Group Config
Set-ResourceManagementClient -BaseAddress http://mymimportalserver.:5725 -Credentials $credentials

 

\routes\index.js

This file details the encrypted credentials the site uses. You will need to generate the encrypted credentials for your environment. You can do this using the powershell-credentials-encryption-tools. Download that script to your workstation and unzip it. Open the credentialEncryptor.ps1 script using an Administrator PowerShell ISE session.

I’ve changed the index.js to accept two sets of credentials. This is because your Azure Admin Credentials are going to be different from your MIM Administrator Credentials (both in name and password). The username for my Azure account looks something like myname@mycompany.com whereas for MIM it is Domainname\Username.

Provide an account name for your Azure environment and the associated password.

The tool will create the encrypted credential files.

Rename the encrypted.credentials file to whatever makes sense for your environment. I’ve renamed it creds1.encrypted.credentials.

Now we re-run the script to create another set of encrypted credentials. This time for Microsoft Identity Manager. Once created, rename the encrypted.credentials file to something that makes sense in your environment. I’ve renamed the second set to creds2.encrypted.credentials.

We now need to copy the following files to your UI Website C:\nodejs\powershell-command-executor-ui-master directory:

  • creds1.encrypted.credentials
  • creds2.encrypted.credentials
  • decryptUtil.ps1
  • secret.key

Navigate back to Routes.js and open the file in an editor such as Notepad++

Update the index.js file for the path to your credentials files. We also need to add in the additional credentials file.

The changes to the file are, the paths to the files we just copied above along with the addition var PATH_TO_ENCRYPTED_RPSCREDENTIALS_FILE for the second set of credentials used for Microsoft Identity Manager.

var PATH_TO_DECRYPT_UTILS_SCRIPT = "C:\\nodejs\\powershell-command-executor-ui-master\\decryptUtil.ps1";
var PATH_TO_ENCRYPTED_CREDENTIALS_FILE = "C:\\nodejs\\powershell-command-executor-ui-master\\creds1.encrypted.credentials";
var PATH_TO_ENCRYPTED_RPSCREDENTIALS_FILE = "C:\\nodejs\\powershell-command-executor-ui-master\\creds2-encrypted.credentials";
var PATH_TO_SECRET_KEY = "C:\\nodejs\\powershell-command-executor-ui-master\\secret.key";


Also to initCommands to pass through the additional credentials file


initCommands: o365Utils.getO365PSInitCommands(
 PATH_TO_DECRYPT_UTILS_SCRIPT,
 PATH_TO_ENCRYPTED_CREDENTIALS_FILE,
 PATH_TO_ENCRYPTED_RPSCREDENTIALS_FILE,
 PATH_TO_SECRET_KEY,
 10000,30000,3600000),

Here is the full index.js file for reference.

 

public/console.html

The public/console.html file is for formatting and associated UI components. The key things I’ve updated are the Bootstrap and AngularJS versions. Those are contained in the top of the html document. A summary is below.

https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/angularjs/1.6.1/angular.min.js
https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/angular.js/1.6.1/angular-resource.min.js
http://javascripts/ui-bootstrap-tpls-2.4.0.min.js
http://javascripts/console.js
<link rel="stylesheet" href="https://maxcdn.bootstrapcdn.com/bootstrap/3.3.7/css/bootstrap.min.css">
<link rel="stylesheet" href="https://maxcdn.bootstrapcdn.com/bootstrap/3.3.7/css/bootstrap-theme.min.css">

You will also need to download the updated Bootstrap UI (ui-bootstrap-tpls-2.4.0.min.js). I’m using v2.4.0 which you can download from here. Copy it to the javascripts directory.

I’ve also updated the table types, buttons, colours, header, logo etc in the appropriate locations (CSS, Tables, Div’s etc). Here is my full file for reference. You’ll need to update for your colours, branding etc.

powershell-command-executor\O365Utils.js

Finally the O365Utils.js file. This contains the commands that will be displayed along with their options, as well as the connection information for your Microsoft Identity Manager environment.

You will need to change:

  • Line 52 for the address of your MIM Sync Server
  • Line 55 for the addresses of your MIM Service Server
  • Line 141 on-wards for what commands and parameters for those commands you want to make available in the UI

Here is an example with a couple of AzureAD commands, a MIM Sync and a MIM Service command.

Show me my PowerShell UI Website

Now that we have everything configured let’s start the site and browse to it. If you haven’t stopped the NodeJS site from earlier go to the command window and press Cntrl+C a couple of times. Run “c:\Program Files\nodejs\node.exe” bin\www again from the C:\nodejs\powershell-command-executor-ui-master directory unless you have restarted the host and now have NodeJS in your environment path.

In a browser on the same host go to http://localhost:3000 again and you should see the site as it is below.

Branding and styling from the console.html, menu options from the o365Utils.js and when you select a command and execute it data from the associated service …….

… you can see results. From the screenshot below a Get-AzureADUser command for the associated search string executed in milliseconds.

 

Summary

The powershell-command-executor-ui from bitsofinfo is a very extensible and powerful NodeJS website as a front-end to PowerShell.

With a few tweaks and updates the look and feel can be easily changed along with the addition of any powershell commands that you wish to have a UI for.

As it sits though keep in mind you have a UI with hard-coded credentials that can do whatever commands you expose.

Personally I am running one for my use only and I have it hosted in Azure in its own Resource Group with an NSG allowing outgoing traffic to Azure and my MIM environment. Incoming traffic is only allowed from my personal management workstations IP address. I also needed to allow port 3000 into the server on the NSG as well as the firewall on the host. I did that quickly using the command below.

# Enable the WebPort NodeJS is using on the firewall 
netsh advfirewall firewall add rule name="NodeJS WebPort 3000" dir=in action=allow protocol=TCP localport=3000

Follow Darren on Twitter @darrenjrobinson

Azure AD Connect – Using AuthoritativeNull in a Sync Rule

There is a feature in Azure AD Connect that became available in the November 2015 build 1.0.9125.0 (listed here), which has not had much fanfare but can certainly come in handy in tricky situations. I happened to be working on a project that required the DNS domain linked to an old Office 365 tenant to be removed so that it could be used in a new tenant. Although the old tenant was no long used for Exchange Online services, it held onto the domain in question, and Azure AD Connect was being used to synchronise objects between the on-premise Active Directory and Azure Active Directory.

Trying to remove the domain using the Office 365 Portal will reveal if there are any items that need to be remediated prior to removing the domain from the tenant, and for this customer it showed that there were many user and group objects that still had the domain used as the userPrincipalName value, and in the mail and proxyAddresses attribute values. The AuthoritativeNull literal could be used in this situation to blank out these values against user and groups (ie. Distribution Lists) so that the domain can be released. I’ll attempt to show the steps in a test environment, and bear with me as this is a lengthy blog.

Trying to remove the domain minnelli.net listed the items needing attention, as shown in the following screenshots:

This report showed that three actions are required to remove the domain values out of the attributes:

  • userPrincipalName
  • proxyAddresses
  • mail

userPrincipalName is simple to resolve by changing the value in the on-premise Active Directory using a different domain suffix, then synchronising the changes to Azure Active Directory so that the default onmicrosoft.com or another accepted domain is set.

Clearing the proxyAddresses and mail attribute values is possible using the AuthoritativeNull literal in Azure AD Connect. NOTE: You will need to assess the outcome of performing these steps depending on your scenario. For my customer, we were able to perform these steps without affecting other services required from the old Office 365 tenant.

Using the Synchronization Rules Editor, locate and edit the In from AD – User Common rule. Editing the out-of-the-box rules will display a message to suggest you create an editable copy of the rule and disable the original rule which is highly recommended, so click Yes.

The rule is cloned as shown below and we need to be mindful of the Precedence value which we will get to shortly.

Select Transformations and edit the proxyAddresses attribute, set the FlowType to Expression, and set the Source to AuthoritativeNull.

I recommend setting the Precedence value in the new cloned rule to be the same as the original rule, in this case value 104. Firstly edit the original rule to a value such as 1001, and you can also notice the original rule is already set to Disabled.

Set the cloned rule Precedence value to 104.

Prior to performing a Full Synchronization run profile to process the new logic, I prefer and recommend to perform a Preview by selecting a user affected and previewing a Full Synchronization change. As can be seen below, the proxyAddresses value will be deleted.

The same process would need to be done for the mail attribute.

Once the rules are set, launch the following PowerShell command to perform a Full Import/Full Synchronization cycle in Azure AD Connect:

  • Start-ADSyncSyncCycle -PolicyType Initial

Once the cycle is completed, attempt to remove the domain again to check if any other items need remediation, or you might see a successful domain removal. I’ve seen it take upto 30 minutes or so before being able to remove the domain if all remediation tasks have been completed.

There will be other scenarios where using the AuthoritativeNull literal in a Sync Rule will come in handy. What others can you think of? Leave a description in the comments.

Automate Secondary ADFS Node Installation and Configuration

Originally posted on Nivlesh’s blog @ nivleshc.wordpress.com

Introduction

Additional nodes in an ADFS farm are required to provide redundancy incase your primary ADFS node goes offline. This ensures your ADFS service is still up and servicing all incoming requests. Additional nodes also help in load balancing the incoming traffic, which provides a better user experience in cases of high authentication traffic.

Overview

Once an ADFS farm has been created, adding additional nodes is quite simple and mostly relies on the same concepts for creating the ADFS farm. I would suggest reading my previous blog Automate ADFS Farm Installation and Configuration as some of the steps we will use in this blog were documented in it.

In this blog, I will show how to automatically provision a secondary ADFS node to an existing ADFS farm. The learnings in this blog can be easily used to deploy more ADFS nodes automatically, if needed.

Install ADFS Role

After provisioning a new Azure virtual machine, we need to install the Active Directory Federation Services role on it.  To do this, we will use the same Desired State Configuration (DSC) script that was used in the blog Automate ADFS Farm Installation and Configuration. Please refer to the section Install ADFS Role in the above blog for the steps to create the DSC script file InstallADFS.ps1.

Add to an existing ADFS Farm

Once the ADFS role has been installed on the virtual machine, we will create a Custom Script Extension (CSE) to add it to the ADFS farm.

In order to do this, we need the following

  • certificate that was used to create the ADFS farm
  • ADFS service account credentials that was used to create the ADFS farm

Once the above prerequisites have been met, we need a method for making the files available to the CSE. I documented a neat trick to “sneak-in” the certificate and password files onto the virtual machine by using Desired State Configuration (DSC) package files in my previous blog. Please refer to Automate ADFS Farm Installation and Configuration under the section Create ADFS Farm for the steps.

Also note, for adding the node to the adfs farm, the domain user credentials are not required. The certificate file will be named adfs_certificate.pfx  and the file containing the encrypted adfs service account password will be named adfspass.key.

Assuming that the prerequisites have been satisfied, and the files have been “sneaked” onto the virtual machine, lets proceed to creating the CSE.

Open Windows Powershell ISE and paste the following.

param (
  $DomainName,
  $PrimaryADFSServer,
  $AdfsSvcUsername
)

The above shows the parameters that need to be passed to the CSE where

$DomainName is the name of the Active Directory domain
$PrimaryADFSServer is the hostname of the primary ADFS server
$AdfsSvcUsername is the username of the ADFS service account

Save the file with a name of your choice (do not close the file as we will be adding more lines to it). I named my script AddToADFSFarm.ps1

Next, we need to define a variable that will contain the path to the directory where the certificate file and the file containing the encrypted adfs service account password are stored. Also, we need a variable to hold the key that was used to encrypt the adfs service account password. This will be required to decrypt the password.

Add the following to the CSE file

Next, we need to decrypt the encrypted adfs service account password.

Now, we need to import the certificate into the local computer certificate store. To make things simple, when the certificate was exported from the primary ADFS server, it was encrypted using the adfs service account password.

After importing the certificate, we will read it to get its thumbprint.

Up until now, the steps are very similar to creating an ADFS farm. However, below is where they diverge.

Add the following lines to add the virtual machine to the existing ADFS farm

You now have a custom script extension file that will add a virtual machine as a secondary node to an existing ADFS Farm.

Below is the full CSE

All that is missing now is the method to bootstrap the scripts described above (InstallADFS.ps1 and AddToADFSFarm.ps1) using Azure Resource Manager (ARM) templates.

Below is part of an ARM template that can be added to your existing template to install the ADFS role on a virtual machine and then add the virtual machine as a secondary node to the ADFS farm

In the above ARM template, the parameter ADFS02VMName refers to the hostname of the virtual machine that will be added to the ADFS Farm.

Listed below are the variables that have been used in the ARM template above

The above method can be used to add as many nodes to the ADFS farm as needed.

I hope this comes in handy when creating an ARM template to automatically deploy an ADFS Farm with additional nodes.

Ubuntu security hardening for the cloud.

Hardening Ubuntu Server Security For Use in the Cloud

The following describes a few simple means of improving Ubuntu Server security for use in the cloud. Many of the optimizations discussed below apply equally to other Linux based distribution although the commands and settings will vary somewhat.

Azure cloud specific recommendations

  1. Use private key and certificate based SSH authentication exclusively and never use passwords.
  2. Never employ common usernames such as root , admin or administrator.
  3. Change the default public SSH port away from 22.

AWS cloud specific recommendations

AWS makes available a small list of recommendation for securing Linux in their cloud security whitepaper.

Ubuntu / Linux specific recommendations

1. Disable the use of all insecure protocols (FTP, Telnet, RSH and HTTP) and replace them with their encrypted counterparts such as sFTP, SSH, SCP and HTTPS

yum erase inetd xinetd ypserv tftp-server telnet-server rsh-server

2. Uninstall all unnecessary packages

dpkg --get-selections | grep -v deinstall
dpkg --get-selections | grep postgres
yum remove packageName

For more information: http://askubuntu.com/questions/17823/how-to-list-all-installed-packages

3. Run the most recent kernel version available for your distribution

For more information: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Kernel/LTSEnablementStack

4. Disable root SSH shell access

Open the following file…

sudo vim /etc/ssh/sshd_config

… then change the following value to no.

PermitRootLogin yes

For more information: http://askubuntu.com/questions/27559/how-do-i-disable-remote-ssh-login-as-root-from-a-server

5. Grant shell access to as few users as possible and limit their permissions

Limiting shell access is an important means of securing a system. Shell access is inherently dangerous because of the risk of unlawfully privilege escalations as with any operating systems, however stolen credentials are a concern too.

Open the following file…

sudo vim /etc/ssh/sshd_config

… then add an entry for each user to be allowed.

AllowUsers jim,tom,sally

For more information: http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/howto-limit-what-users-can-log-onto-system-via-ssh/

6. Limit or change the IP addresses SSH listens on

Open the following file…

sudo vim /etc/ssh/sshd_config

… then add the following.

ListenAddress <IP ADDRESS>

For more information:

http://askubuntu.com/questions/82280/how-do-i-get-ssh-to-listen-on-a-new-ip-without-restarting-the-machine

7. Restrict all forms of access to the host by individual IPs or address ranges

TCP wrapper based access lists can be included in the following files.

/etc/hosts.allow
/etc/hosts.deny

Note: Any changes to your hosts.allow and hosts.deny files take immediate effect, no restarts are needed.

Patterns

ALL : 123.12.

Would match all hosts in the 123.12.0.0 network.

ALL : 192.168.0.1/255.255.255.0

An IP address and subnet mask can be used in a rule.

sshd : /etc/sshd.deny

If the client list begins with a slash (/), it is treated as a filename. In the above rule, TCP wrappers looks up the file sshd.deny for all SSH connections.

sshd : ALL EXCEPT 192.168.0.15

This will allow SSH connections from only the machine with IP address 192.168.0.15 and block all other connection attemps. You can use the options allow or deny to allow or restrict access on a per client basis in either of the files.

in.telnetd : 192.168.5.5 : deny
in.telnetd : 192.168.5.6 : allow

Warning: While restricting system shell access by IP address be very careful not to loose access to the system by locking the administrative user out!

For more information: https://debian-administration.org/article/87/Keeping_SSH_access_secure

8. Check listening network ports

Check listening ports and uninstall or disable all unessential or insecure protocols and deamons.

netstat -tulpn

9. Install Fail2ban

Fail2ban is a means of dealing with unwanted system access attempts over any protocol against a Linux host. It uses rule sets to automate variable length IP banning sources of configurable activity patterns such as SPAM, (D)DOS or brute force attacks.

“Fail2Ban is an intrusion prevention software framework that protects computer servers from brute-force attacks. Written in the Python programming language, it is able to run on POSIX systems that have an interface to a packet-control system or firewall installed locally, for example, iptables or TCP Wrapper.” – Wikipedia

For more information: https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-protect-ssh-with-fail2ban-on-ubuntu-14-04

10. Improve the robustness of TCP/IP

Add the following to harden your networking configuration…

10-network-security.conf

… such as

sudo vim /etc/sysctl.d/10-network-security.conf
Ignore ICMP broadcast requests
net.ipv4.icmp_echo_ignore_broadcasts = 1

# Disable source packet routing
net.ipv4.conf.all.accept_source_route = 0
net.ipv6.conf.all.accept_source_route = 0 
net.ipv4.conf.default.accept_source_route = 0
net.ipv6.conf.default.accept_source_route = 0

# Ignore send redirects
net.ipv4.conf.all.send_redirects = 0
net.ipv4.conf.default.send_redirects = 0

# Block SYN attacks
net.ipv4.tcp_max_syn_backlog = 2048
net.ipv4.tcp_synack_retries = 2
net.ipv4.tcp_syn_retries = 5

# Log Martians
net.ipv4.conf.all.log_martians = 1
net.ipv4.icmp_ignore_bogus_error_responses = 1

# Ignore ICMP redirects
net.ipv4.conf.all.accept_redirects = 0
net.ipv6.conf.all.accept_redirects = 0
net.ipv4.conf.default.accept_redirects = 0 
net.ipv6.conf.default.accept_redirects = 0

# Ignore Directed pings
net.ipv4.icmp_echo_ignore_all = 1

And load the new rules as follows.

service procps start

For more information: https://blog.mattbrock.co.uk/hardening-the-security-on-ubuntu-server-14-04/

11. If you are serving web traffic install mod-security

Web application firewalls can be helpful in warning of and fending off a range of attack vectors including SQL injection, (D)DOS, cross-site scripting (XSS) and many others.

“ModSecurity is an open source, cross-platform web application firewall (WAF) module. Known as the “Swiss Army Knife” of WAFs, it enables web application defenders to gain visibility into HTTP(S) traffic and provides a power rules language and API to implement advanced protections.”

For more information: https://modsecurity.org/

12. Install a firewall such as IPtables

IPtables is a highlight configurable and very powerful Linux forewall which has a great deal to offer in terms of bolstering hosts based security.

iptables is a user-space application program that allows a system administrator to configure the tables provided by the Linux kernel firewall (implemented as different Netfilter modules) and the chains and rules it stores.” – Wikipedia.

For more information: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/IptablesHowTo

13. Keep all packages up to date at all times and install security updates as soon as possible

 sudo apt-get update        # Fetches the list of available updates
 sudo apt-get upgrade       # Strictly upgrades the current packages
 sudo apt-get dist-upgrade  # Installs updates (new ones)

14. Install multifactor authentication for shell access

Nowadays it’s possible to use multi-factor authentication for shell access thanks to Google Authenticator.

For more information: https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-set-up-multi-factor-authentication-for-ssh-on-ubuntu-14-04

15. Add a second level of authentication behind every web based login page

Stolen passwords are a common problem whether as a result of a vulnerable web application, an SQL injection, a compromised end user computer or something else altogether adding a second layer of protection using .htaccess authentication with credentials stored on the filesystem not in a database is great added security.

For more information: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6441578/how-secure-is-htaccess-password-protection

Are There Sufficient Standards in Cloud Computing Today?

The hybrid cloud may be a hot topic with adoption growing faster than ever but should we be concerned about a lack of established standards?

What is the Hybrid Cloud?

Private clouds, whether owned or leased, generally consist of closed IT infrastructures accessible only to a business which then makes available resources to it’s own internal customers. Private clouds are often home to core applications where control is essential to the business, they can also offer economies of scales where companies can afford larger, long term investments and have the ability to either run these environments themselves or pay for a managed service. Private cloud investments tend to operate on a CAPEX model.

Public clouds are shared platforms for services made available by third parties to their customers on a pay-as-you go basis. Public cloud environments are best suited to all but the most critical and expensive applications to run. They offer the significant benefit of not requiring large upfront capital investments because they operate on an OPEX model.

Hybrid clouds on the other hand are made up of a mix of both types of resources working together across secured, private network connections. They can offer the benefits of both models but run the risk of additional complexity and can lessen the benefits of working at scale.

Enter the Multi-Cloud

With an ever growing number of businesses seeking to adopt a multi-cloud / multi-vendor strategy, the potential benefits of this new take are clear. It’s an approach which offers increased resiliency and the best in feature sets while minimizing lock-in; albeit at the cost of having to manage more complex infrastructure and billing structures.

However in the absence of standards, cloud providers and hardware vendors have been building proprietary stacks with little common ground which is stymying the movement of applications and workloads across clouds and represents a challenge for business up-take.

So it seems clear that a gap in cloud computing standards and insufficient overlap among hardware vendors of private cloud technologies has been hampering adoption something which needs to be addressed.

Standards are Coming However

Generally speaking standards follow market forces, particularly where the pace of innovation is fairly rapid, in a market of this size however they will undoubtedly catch up eventually. Case in point a number of standards are expected be finalized reasonably soon and reach the industry inside the next couple of years from organizations such as the IEEE Standards Association, Cloud Standards Coordination, The Open Networking User Group and others which will be a welcome development and a significant asset for the industry.

Some additional information about these organizations.

– IEEE Standards Association

Developing Standards for Cloud Computing

“The IEEE Standards Association (IEEE-SA) is a leading consensus building organization that nurtures, develops and advances global technologies, through IEEE. We bring together a broad range of individuals and organizations from a wide range of technical and geographic points of origin to facilitate standards development and standards related collaboration. With collaborative thought leaders in more than 160 countries, we promote innovation, enable the creation and expansion of international markets and help protect health and public safety. Collectively, our work drives the functionality, capabilities and interoperability of a wide range of products and services that transform the way people live, work and communicate.” – IEEE Standards Association.

– Cloud Standards Customer Council

“The Cloud Standards Customer Council (CSCC) is an end user advocacy group dedicated to accelerating cloud’s successful adoption, and drilling down into the standards, security and interoperability issues surrounding the transition to the cloud. The Council separates the hype from the reality on how to leverage what customers have today and how to use open, standards-based cloud computing to extend their organizations. CSCC provides cloud users with the opportunity to drive client requirements into standards development organizations and deliver materials such as best practices and use cases to assist other enterprises.

Cloud Standards Customer Council founding enterprise members include IBM, Kaavo, CA Technologies, Rackspace & Software AG. More than 500 of the world’s leading organizations have already joined the Council, including Lockheed Martin, Citigroup, Boeing, State Street Bank, Aetna, AARP, AT&T, Ford Motor Company, Lowe’s, and others.” – Cloud Standards Customer Council.

http://cloud-standards.org/wiki/index.php?title=Main_Page

– The Open Networking User Group’s Mission Statement and History

“The ONUG Hybrid Cloud Working Group framework seeks to commoditize infrastructure and increase choice among enterprise buyers of public cloud services. The goal is to have a framework, which identifies a minimum set of common issues and collective requirements that will swing leverage into the hands of enterprise buyers of hybrid cloud services.

The ONUG Mission is to enable greater choice and options for IT business leaders by advocating for open interoperable hardware and software-defined infrastructure solutions that span across the entire IT stack, all in an effort to create business value.”

The Open Networking User Group (ONUG) was created in early 2012 as the result of a discussion between Nick Lippis, of the Lippis Report, and Ernest Lefner, about the need for a smaller, more user-focused open networking conference. From there, the two brought together the founding board of IT leaders from the likes of Bank of America, Fidelity Investments, JPMorgan Chase, UBS, and Gap Inc. Managed by Nick, the board worked together to create the first ONUG event, held on February 13, 2013 at the Fidelity Auditorium in Boston, Massachusetts. – The Open Networking Users group.

https://opennetworkingusergroup.com

How to export user error data from Azure AD Connect with CSExport

A short post is a good post?! – the other day I had some problems with users synchronising with Azure AD via Azure AD Connect. Ultimately Azure AD Connect was not able to meet the requirements of the particular solution, as Microsoft Identity Manager (MIM) 2016 has the final 5% of the config required for, as I found out, a complicated user+resource and user forest design.

In saying that though, during my troubleshooting, I was looking at ways to export the error data from Azure AD Connect. I wanted to have the data more accessible as sometimes looking at problematic users one by one isn’t ideal. Having it all in a CSV file makes it rather easy.

So here’s a short blog post on how to get that data out of Azure AD Connect to streamline troubleshooting purposes.

What

Azure AD Connect has a way to make things nice and easy, but, at the same time makes you want to pull your hair out. When digging a little, you can get the information that you want. However, at first, you could be presented with a whole bunch of errors like this:

Unable to update this object because the following attributes associated with this object have values that may already be associated with another object in your local directory services: [UserPrincipalName user@domain.com]. Correct or remove the duplicate values in your local directory. Please refer to http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2647098 for more information on identifying objects with duplicate attribute values.

I beleive its Event ID: 6941 in eventvwr as well 

It’s not a complicated error. It’s rather self explanatory. However, when you have a bunch of them; say anything more that 20 or so, as I said earlier; it’s easier to export it all for quick reference and faster review.

How

To export that error data to a CSV file, complete the following steps:

Open a cmd prompt 
CD: or change the directory to "C:\Program Files\Microsoft Azure AD Sync\bin" 
Run: "CSExport “[Name of Connector]” [%temp%]\Errors-Export.xml /f:x" - without the [ ]

The name of the connector above can be found in the AADC Synchronisation Service.

Now to view that data in a nice CSV format, the following steps can be run to convert that into something more manageable:

Run: "CSExportAnalyzer [%temp%]\Errors-Export.xml > [%temp%]\Errors-Export.csv" - again, without the [ ] 
You now have a file in your [%temp%] directory named "Errors-Export.csv".

Happy days!

Final words

So a short blog post, but, I think a valuable one in that getting the info into a more easily digestible format should result in faster troubleshooting. In saying that, this doesn’t give you all errors in all area’s of AADC. Enjoy!

Best, Lucian


Originally posted on Lucian’s blog at clouduccino.com. Follow Lucian on Twitter @LucianFrango.

Azure networking VNET architecture best practice update (post #MSIgnite 2016)

During Microsoft Ignite 2016 I attended a few Azure networking architecture sessions. Towards the end of the week, though, they did overlap some content which was not ideal. A key message was there though. An interesting bit of reference architecture information.

Of note and relevant to this blog post:

  • Migrate and disaster recover Azure workloads using Operations Management Suite by Mahesh Unnifrishan, Microsoft Program Manager
  • Review ExpressRoute for Office 365 configuration (routing, proxy and network security) by Paul Andrew, Senior Product Marketing Manager
  • Run highly available solutions on Microsoft Azure by Igal Figlin, Principal PM- Availability, Scalability and Performance on Azure
  • Gain insight into real-world usage of the Microsoft cloud using Azure ExpressRoute by Bala Natarajan Microsoft Program Manager
  • Achieve high-performance data centre expansion with Azure Networking by Narayan Annamalai, Principal PM Manager, Microsoft

Background

For the last few years there has been one piece of design around Azure Virtual Networks (VNETs) that caused angst. When designing a reference architecture for VNETs, creating multi tiered solutions was generally not recommended. For the most part, a single VNET with multiple subnets (from Microsoft solution architects I spoke with) was the norm. This didn’t scale well across regions and required multiple and repetitive configurations when working at scale; or Microsoft’s buzz words from the conference: hyper-scale.

2016-10-11-example-01

VNet Peering

At Microsoft Ignite, VNET peering was made generally available on September 28th (reference and official statement).  VNET peering allows for the connectivity of VNETs in the same region without the need of a gateway. It extends the network segment to essentially allows for all communication between the VNETs as if they were a single network. Each VNET is still managed independently of one another; so NSG’s, for example, would need to be managed on each VNET.

Extending across regions VNET peering across regions is still the biggest issue. When this feature comes, it will be another game changer. Amazon Web Services also has VPC peering, but, is also limited to a single region. Microsoft has caught up in this regard.

Interesting and novel designs can now be achieved with VNET peering.

Hub and spoke

I’m not a specialist network guy. I’ve done various Cisco studies and never committed to getting certified, but, did enough to be dangerous!

VNET peering has one major advantage: the ability to centralise shared resources, like for example networking virtual appliances.

A standard network topology design known as hub and spoke features centralised provisioning of core components in a hub network with additional networks in spokes stemming from the core.

2016-10-11-example-02

Larger customers opt to use virtual firewall (Palo Alto or F5 firewall appliances) or load balancers (F5 BigIP’s) as network teams are generally well skilled in these and re-learning practices in Azure is time-consuming and costly.

Now Microsoft, via program managers on several occasions, recommends a new standard practice of using the hub and spoke network topology and leveraging the ability to centrally store network components that are shared. This could even extend to centrally store certain logical segmented areas, for example a DMZ segment.

I repeat: a recommended network design for most environments is generally a hub and spoke leveraging VNET peering and centralising shared resources in the hub VNET.

Important

These new possibilities offer awesome network architecture designs that can now be achieved. Important to note though, is that there are limits imposed.

Speaking with various program managers, limits in most services are there are a guide and form a logical understanding of what can be achieved. However, in most cases these can be raised through discussion with Microsoft.

The limits on VNET peering applies to two areas. The first is number of networks able to be peering to a single network (currently 50). The second is the number of routes able to be advertised when using ExpressRoute and VNET peering. Review the following Azure documentation article for more info on these limits: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/azure-subscription-service-limits/#networking-limits.

Finally, it’s important to note that not every network is identical and requirements change from customer to customer. What is additionally as important is to implement consistent and proven architecture topologies that leverages on the knowledge and experience of others. Basically, stand on the shoulders of giants.  

Best,

Lucian

How to make a copy of a virtual machine running Windows in Azure

How to make a copy of a virtual machine running Windows in Azure

I was called upon recently to help a customer create copies of some of their Windows virtual machines. The idea was to quickly deploy copies of these hosts at any time as opposed to using a system image or point in time copy.

The following PowerShell will therefore allow you to make a copy or clone of a Windows virtual machine using a copy of it’s disks in Azure Resource Manager mode.

Create a new virtual machine from a copy of the disks of another

Having finalized the configuration of the source virtual machine the steps required are as follows.

  1. Stop the source virtual machine, then using Storage Explorer copy it’s disks to a new location and rename them in line with the target name of the new virtual machine.

  2. Run the following in PowerShell making the required configuration changes.

Login-AzureRmAccount
Get-AzureRmSubscription –SubscriptionName "<subscription-name>" | Select-AzureRmSubscription

$location = (get-azurermlocation | out-gridview -passthru).location
$rgName = "<resource-group>"
$vmName = "<vm-name>"
$nicname = "<nic-name>"
$subnetID = "<subnetID>"
$datadisksize = "<sizeinGB>"
$vmsize = (Get-AzureLocation | Where-Object { $_.name -eq "East US"}).VirtualMachineRoleSizes | out-gridview -passthru
$osDiskUri = "https://<storage-acccount>.blob.core.windows.net/vhds/<os-disk-name.vhd>"
$dataDiskUri = "https://<storage-acccount>.blob.core.windows.net/vhds/<data-disk-name.vhd>"

Notes: The URIs above belong to the copies not the original disks and the SubnetID refers to it’s resource ID.

$nic = New-AzureRmNetworkInterface -Name $nicname -ResourceGroupName $rgName -Location $location -SubnetId $subnetID
$vmConfig = New-AzureRmVMConfig -VMName $vmName -VMSize $vmsize
$vm = Add-AzureRmVMNetworkInterface -VM $vmConfig -Id $nic.Id
$osDiskName = $vmName + "os-disk"
$vm = Set-AzureRmVMOSDisk -VM $vm -Name $osDiskName -VhdUri $osDiskUri -CreateOption attach -Windows
$dataDiskName = $vmName + "data-disk"
$vm = Add-AzureRmVMDataDisk -VM $vm -Name $dataDiskName -VhdUri $dataDiskUri -Lun 0 -Caching 'none' -DiskSizeInGB $datadisksize -CreateOption attach
New-AzureRmVM -ResourceGroupName $rgName -Location $location -VM $vm

List virtual machines in a resource group.

$vmList = Get-AzureRmVM -ResourceGroupName $rgName
$vmList.Name

Having run the above. Log on to the new host in order to make the required changes.

Automate ADFS Farm Installation and Configuration

Originally posted on Nivlesh’s blog @ nivleshc.wordpress.com

Introduction

In this multi-part blog, I will be showing how to automatically install and configure a new ADFS Farm. We will accomplish this using Azure Resource Manager templates, Desired State Configuration scripts and Custom Script Extensions.

Overview

We will use Azure Resource Manager to create a virtual machine that will become our first ADFS Server. We will then use a desired state configuration script to join the virtual machine to our Active Directory domain and to install the ADFS role. Finally, we will use a Custom Script Extension to install our first ADFS Farm.

Install ADFS Role

We will be using the xActiveDirectory and xPendingReboot experimental DSC modules.

Download these from

https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/scriptcenter/xActiveDirectory-f2d573f3

https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/scriptcenter/xPendingReboot-PowerShell-b269f154

After downloading, unzip the file and  place the contents in the Powershell modules directory located at $env:ProgramFiles\WindowsPowerShell\Modules (unless you have changed your systemroot folder, this will be located at C:\ProgramFiles\WindowsPowerShell\Modules )

Open your Windows Powershell ISE and lets create a DSC script that will join our virtual machine to the domain and also install the ADFS role.

Copy the following into a new Windows Powershell ISE file and save it as a filename of your choice (I saved mine as InstallADFS.ps1)

In the above, we are declaring some mandatory parameters and some variables that will be used within the script

$MachineName is the hostname of the virtual machine that will become the first ADFS server

$DomainName is the name of the domain where the virtual machine will be joined

$AdminCreds contains the username and password for an account that has permissions to join the virtual machine to the domain

$RetryCount and $RetryIntervalSec hold values that will be used to  check if the domain is available

We need to import the experimental DSC modules that we had downloaded. To do this, add the following lines to the DSC script

Import-DscResource -Module xActiveDirectory, xPendingReboot

Next, we need to convert the supplied $AdminCreds into a domain\username format. This is accomplished by the following lines (the converted value is held in $DomainCreds )

Next, we need to tell DSC that the command needs to be run on the local computer. This is done by the following line (localhost refers to the local computer)

Node localhost

We need to tell the LocalConfigurationManager that it should reboot the server if needed, continue with the configuration after reboot,  and to just apply the settings only once (DSC can apply a setting and constantly monitor it to check that it has not been changed. If the setting is found to be changed, DSC can re-apply the setting. In our case we will not do this, we will apply the setting just once).

Next, we need to check if the Active Directory domain is ready. For this, we will use the xWaitForADDomain function from the xActiveDirectory experimental DSC module.

Once we know that the Active Directory domain is available, we can go ahead and join the virtual machine to the domain.

the JoinDomain function depends on xWaitForADDomain. If xWaitForADDomain fails, JoinDomain will not run

Once the virtual machine has been added to the domain, it needs to be restarted. We will use xPendingReboot function from the xPendingReboot experimental DSC module to accomplish this.

Next, we will install the ADFS role on the virtual machine

Our script has now successfully added the virtual machine to the domain and installed the ADFS role on it. Next, create a zip file with InstallADFS.ps1 and upload it to a location that Azure Resource Manager can access (I would recommend uploading to GitHub). Include the xActiveDirectory and xPendingReboot experimental DSC module directories in the zip file as well. Also add a folder called Certificates inside the zip file and put the ADFS certificate and the encrypted password files (discussed in the next section) inside the folder.

In the next section, we will configure the ADFS Farm.

The full InstallADFS.ps1 DSC script is pasted below

Create ADFS Farm

Once the ADFS role has been installed, we will use Custom Script Extensions (CSE) to create the ADFS farm.

One of the requirements to configure ADFS is a signed certificate. I used a 90 day trial certificate from Comodo.

There is a trick that I am using to make my certificate available on the virtual machine. If you bootstrap a DSC script to your virtual machine in an Azure Resource Manager template, the script along with all the non out-of-box DSC modules have to be packaged into a zip file and uploaded to a location that ARM can access. ARM then will download the zip file, unzip it, and place all directories inside the zip file to $env:ProgramFiles\WindowsPowerShell\Modules ( C:\ProgramFiles\WindowsPowerShell\Modules ) ARM assumes the directories are PowerShell modules and puts them in the appropriate directory.

I am using this feature to sneak my certificate on to the virtual machine. I create a folder called Certificates inside the zip file containing the DSC script and put the certificate inside it. Also, I am not too fond of passing plain passwords from my ARM template to the CSE, so I created two files, one to hold the encrypted password for the domain administrator account and the other to contain the encrypted password of the adfs service account. These two files are named adminpass.key and adfspass.key and will be placed in the same Certificates folder within the zip file.

I used the following to generate the encrypted password files

AdminPlainTextPassword and ADFSPlainTextPassword are the plain text passwords that will be encrypted.

$key  is used to convert the secure string into an encrypted standard string. Valid key lengths are 16, 24, 32

For this blog, we will use

$Key = (3,4,2,3,56,34,254,222,1,1,2,23,42,54,33,233,1,34,2,7,6,5,35,43)

Open Windows PowerShell ISE and paste the following (save the file with a name of your choice. I saved mine as ConfigureADFS.ps1)

param (
 $DomainName,
 $DomainAdminUsername,
 $AdfsSvcUsername
)

These are the parameters that will be passed to the CSE

$DomainName is the name of the Active Directory domain
$DomainAdminUsername is the username of the domain administrator account
$AdfsSvcUsername is the username of the ADFS service account

Next, we will define the value of the Key that was used to encrypt the password and the location where the certificate and the encrypted password files will be placed

$localpath = "C:\Program Files\WindowsPowerShell\Modules\Certificates\"
$Key = (3,4,2,3,56,34,254,222,1,1,2,23,42,54,33,233,1,34,2,7,6,5,35,43)

Now, we have to read the encrypted passwords from the adminpass.key and adfspass.key file and then convert them into a domain\username format

Next, we will import the certificate into the local computer certificate store. We will mark the certificate exportable and set the password same as the domain administrator password.

In the above after the certificate is imported,  $cert is used to hold the certificate thumbprint

Next, we will configure the ADFS Farm

The ADFS Federation Service displayname is set to “Active Directory Federation Service” and the Federation Service Name is set to fs.adfsfarm.com

Upload the CSE to a location that Azure Resource Manager can access (I uploaded my script to GitHub)

The full ConfigureADFS.ps1 CSE is shown below

Azure Resource Manager Template Bootstrapping

Now that the DSC and CSE scripts have been created, we need to add them in our ARM template, straight after the virtual machine is provisioned.

To add the DSC script, create a DSC extension and link it to the DSC Package that was created to install ADFS. Below is an example of what can be used

The extension will run after the ADFS virtual machine has been successfully created (referred to as ADFS01VMName)

The MachineName, DomainName and domain administrator credentials are passed to the DSC extension.

Below are the variables that have been used in the json file for the DSC extension (I have listed my GitHub repository location)

Next, we have to create a Custom Script Extension to link to the CSE for configuring ADFS. Below is an example that can be used

The CSE depends on the ADFS virtual machine being successfully provisioned and the DSC extension that installs the ADFS role to have successfully completed.

The DomainName, Domain Administrator Username and the ADFS Service Username are passed to the CSE script

The following contains a list of the variables being used by the CSE (the example below shows my GitHub repository location)

"repoLocation": "https://raw.githubusercontent.com/nivleshc/arm/master/",
"ConfigureADFSScriptUrl": "[concat(parameters('repoLocation'),'ConfigureADFS.ps1')]",

That’s it Folks! You now have an ARM Template that can be used to automatically install the ADFS role and then configure a new ADFS Farm.

In my next blog, we will explore how to add another node to the ADFS Farm and we will also look at how we can automatically create a Web Application Proxy server for our ADFS Farm.