Integration Testing Timer-Triggered Precompiled v2 Azure Functions

In a recent post, I described a way to run integration tests against precompiled C# Azure Functions using the v2 runtime. In that post, we looked at an example of invoking an HTTP-triggered function from within an integration test.

Of course, there are plenty of other triggers available for Azure Functions too. Recently I needed to write an integration test against a timer-triggered function and decided to investigate the best way to do this.

The Azure Functions runtime provides a convenient API for invoking a timer-trigger function.… [Keep reading] “Integration Testing Timer-Triggered Precompiled v2 Azure Functions”

Integration Testing Precompiled v2 Azure Functions

Azure Functions code can often contain important functionality that needs to be tested. The two most common ways of testing code are unit testing and integration testing. Unit testing runs pieces of code in isolation, and this is relatively simple to do with Azure Functions. Integration testing can be a little trickier though, and I haven’t found any good documentation about how do this with version 2 of the Functions runtime. In this post I’ll outline the approach I’m using to run integration tests against my Azure Functions v2 code.… [Keep reading] “Integration Testing Precompiled v2 Azure Functions”

Deploying App Services with ‘Run From Package’, Azure Storage, and Azure Pipelines

Azure App Service recently introduced a feature called Run From Package. Rather than uploading our application binaries and other files to an App Service directly, we can instead package them into a zip file and provide App Services with the URL. This is a useful feature because it eliminates issues with file locking during deployments, it allows for atomic updates of application code, and it reduces the time required to boot an application. It also means that the ‘release’ of an application simply involves the deployment of a configuration setting.… [Keep reading] “Deploying App Services with ‘Run From Package’, Azure Storage, and Azure Pipelines”

Enabling Source Control for locally stored code using Git, Visual Studio Code and Sourcetree

First published at https://nivleshc.wordpress.com

Introduction

Coming from a system administration background, I am used to writing scripts to get mundane tasks done. Whenever I saw repeatable tasks, I saw an opportunity to script them, and pass them onto a junior to do 😉
However, writing scripts brings about its own challenges.
Ok, time to fess up 😉 Hands up those that have modified a script, only to realise that the modifications broke it! To make matters worse, you forgot to take a copy of the original!… [Keep reading] “Enabling Source Control for locally stored code using Git, Visual Studio Code and Sourcetree”

VSTS Build Definitions as YAML Part 2: How?

In the last post, I described why you might want to define your build definition as a YAML file using the new YAML Build Definitions feature in VSTS. In this post, we will walk through an example of a simple VSTS YAML build definition for a .NET Core application.

Application Setup

Our example application will be a blank ASP.NET Core web application with a unit test project. I created these using Visual Studio for Mac’s ASP.NET Core Web application template, and added a blank unit test project.… [Keep reading] “VSTS Build Definitions as YAML Part 2: How?”

VSTS Build Definitions as YAML Part 1: What and Why?

Visual Studio Team Services (VSTS) has recently gained the ability to create build definitions as YAML files. This feature is currently in preview. In this post, I’ll explain why this is a great addition to the VSTS platform and why you might want to define your builds in this way. In the next post I’ll work through an example of using this feature, and I’ll also provide some tips and links to documentation and guidance that I found helpful when constructing some build definitions myself.… [Keep reading] “VSTS Build Definitions as YAML Part 1: What and Why?”

Building websites with Ionic Framework, Angular and Microsoft Azure App Services

The Ionic Framework (https://ionicframework.com/) is an angular 4 based framework that is designed to build beautiful applications quickly and easily that can be targeted to native platforms as well as Progressive Web Apps (PWAs).  In this blog post, I’ll walk through the steps to start your own Ionic PWA hosted on Azure App Services, which will then serve your application.

What is Microsoft Azure App Services?

Microsoft Azure is a cloud platform that allows you to host server workloads that you’d previously host locally in a data centre or on a server somewhere to be hosted in an environment where massive scale and availability becomes available at an hourly rate.… [Keep reading] “Building websites with Ionic Framework, Angular and Microsoft Azure App Services”