Azure Front Door with WAF Policies – An overview

If you have been working with Azure Infrastructure services, then you would have come across Core Network offerings such as Azure Traffic manager, Azure Load balancers & Application Gateways. These network services provide solutions for applications that require high availability, security & scalability, but they also come with their own limitations.  One such limitation is that they primarily exist in single regions (regional services). Azure Traffic manager for instance, which works at the DNS level for cross region support, cannot perform path-based routing and the failover time is based on TTL of the DNS record.… [Keep reading] “Azure Front Door with WAF Policies – An overview”

Deploy VPN tunnel between Azure cloud and AWS cloud environment

Recently, I was working with a client who utilizes both AWS and Azure in their business and needed to establish a VPN connection across these cloud providers for certain services. This gave me the opportunity to work on establishing a VPN tunnel between the two public cloud offerings.

I would like to share the steps I used to establish the VPN (Site-to-Site) tunnel between Azure and AWS.

In the ideal world, the Azure VPN Gateway and AWS Gateway offering should have been enough to establish the VPN connection.… [Keep reading] “Deploy VPN tunnel between Azure cloud and AWS cloud environment”

Deploy a Geo-redundant Web App behind an Azure Traffic manager using an ARM template.

This blog will guide you on how to deploy a Web App, App service plan in different geographical locations using Azure Traffic Manager to provide Geo redundancy.  I will discuss these concepts below and provide the necessary steps to achieve this .

We will familiarize ourselves with the terminology and the technologies which will be used in the blog to build out our solution:

  1. Azure APP Services
  2. Azure App Service plan
  3. App Service Editor
  4. Traffic Manager

 

1.Azure App Services

Azure App Service is a fully managed computing platform within the Azure environment that is optimized for hosting web apps, REST APIs, and mobile back ends.… [Keep reading] “Deploy a Geo-redundant Web App behind an Azure Traffic manager using an ARM template.”

Step-by-step: Using Azure DevOps Services to deploy ARM templates with CI/ CD – Part 2

In this blog (Part 2), I take you through on Enabling Continuous Integration (CI) / Continuous Deployment (CD), for the project created on Part 1.

To re-cap, I have made this entire post into two parts for easier understanding and we will focus on Part 2 here:

Part 1- Creating your first project in Azure DevOps (https://blog.kloud.com.au/2018/10/17/step-by-step-using-azure-devops-services-to-deploy-arm-templates-with-ci-cd-part-1/).
Part 2 – Enabling the first project in Azure DevOps for Continuous Integration (CI) / Continuous Deployment (CD).

Enabling the first project in Azure DevOps for Continuous Integration

    • Now, the next step is to enable continuous integration.
[Keep reading] “Step-by-step: Using Azure DevOps Services to deploy ARM templates with CI/ CD – Part 2”

Step-by-step: Using Azure DevOps Services to deploy ARM templates with CI/ CD – Part 1

In this blog, we will see how to get started with Azure DevOps for an Infrastructure background person.

We will familiarize ourselves with deploying your Azure resources with ARM templates by using Azure DevOps with Continuous Integration (CI) and Continuous Deployment (CD).

I have made this entire post into two parts for easier understanding:

Part 1: Creating your first project in Azure DevOps

Part 2: Enabling the first project in Azure DevOps for Continuous Integration (CI) / Continuous Deployment (CD).[Keep reading] “Step-by-step: Using Azure DevOps Services to deploy ARM templates with CI/ CD – Part 1”