Background

In August 2017 Troy Hunted released a sizeable list of Pwned Passwords. 320 Million in fact.

I subsequently wrote this post on Identifying Active Directory Users with Pwned Passwords using Microsoft/Forefront Identity Manager which called the API and sets a boolean attribute in the MIM Service that could be used with business logic to force users with accounts that have compromised passwords to change their password on next logon.

Whilst that was a proof of concept/discussion point of sorts AND  I had a disclaimer about sending passwords across the internet to a third-party service there was a lot of momentum around the HIBP API and I developed a solution and wrote this update to check the passwords locally.

Today Troy has released v2 of that list and updated the API with new features and functionality. If you’re playing catch-up I encourage you to read Troy’s post from August last year, and my two posts about checking Active Directory passwords against that list.

Leveraging V2 (with k-Anonymity) of the Have I Been Pwned API

With v2 of the HIBP passwod list and API the number of leaked credentials in the list has grown to half a billion. 501,636,842 Pwned Passwords to be exact.

With the v2 list in conjunction with Junade Ali from Cloudflare the API has been updated to be leveraged with a level of anonymity. Instead of sending a SHA-1 hash of the password to check if the password you’re checking is on the list you can now send a truncated version of the SHA-1 hash of the password and you will be returned a set of passwords from the HIBP v2 API. This is done using a concept called k-anonymity detailed brilliantly here by Junade Ali.

v2 of the API also returns a score for each password in the list. Basically how many times the password has previously been seen in leaked credentials lists. Brilliant.

Updated Pwned PowerShell Management Agent for Pwned Password Lookup

Below is an updated Password.ps1 script for the previous API version of my Pwned Password Management Agent for Microsoft Identity Manager. It functions by;

  • taking the new password received from PCNS
  • hashes the password to SHA-1 format
  • looks up the v2 HIBP API using part of the SHA-1 hash
  • updates the MIM Service with Pwned Password status

Checkout the original post with all the rest of the details here.

Summary

Of course you can also download (recommended via Torrent) the Pwned Password dataset. Keep in mind that the compressed dataset is 8.75 GB and uncompressed is 29.4 GB. Convert that into an On-Premise SQL Table(s) as I did in the linked post at the beginning of this post and you’ll be well in excess of that.

Awesome work from Tory and Junade.

 

Category:
FIM, Identity and Access Management, Security
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