Last week in a customer development environment I had one of those oh shit moments where I thought I’d lost a couple of weeks of work. A couple of weeks of development around multiple Management Agents, MV Schema changes etc. Luckily for me I was just connecting to an older VM Image, but it got me thinking. It would be nice to have an automated process that each night would;

  • Export each Management Agent on a FIM/MIM Sync Server
  • Export the FIM/MIM Synchronisation Server Configuration
  • Take a copy of the Extensions Folder (where I keep my PowerShell Management Agents scripts)
  • Export the FIM/MIM Service Server Configuration

And that is what this post covers.

Overview

My automated process performs the following;

  1. An Azure PowerShell Timer Function WebApp is triggered at 2330 each night
  2. The Azure Function App initiates a Remote PowerShell session to my Dev MIM Sync Server (which is also a MIM Service Server)
  3. In the Remote PowerShell session the script;
    1. Creates a new subfolder under c:\backup with the current date and time (dd-MM-yyyy-hh-mm)

  1. Creates further subfolders for each of the backup elements
    1. MAExports
    2. ServerExport
    3. MAExtensions
    4. PortalExport

    1. Utilizes the Lithnet MIIS Automation PowerShell Module to;
      1. Enumerate each of the Management Agents on the FIM/MIM Sync Server and export each Management Agent to the MAExports Folder
      2. Export the FIM/MIM Sync Server Configuration to the ServerExport Folder
    2. Copies the Extensions folder and subfolder contexts to the MAExtensions Folder
    3. Utilizes the FIM/MIM Export-FIMConfig cmdlet to export the FIM Server Configuration to the PortalExport Folder

Implementing the FIM/MIM Backup Process

The majority of the setup to get this to work I’ve covered in other posts, particularly around Azure PowerShell Function Apps and Remote PowerShell into a FIM/MIM Sync Server.

Pre-requisites

  • I created a C:\Backup Folder on my FIM/MIM Server. This is where the backups will be placed (you can change the path in the script).
  • I installed the Lithnet MIIS Automation PowerShell Module on my MIM Sync Server
  • I configured my MIM Sync Server to accept Remote PowerShell Sessions. That involved enabling WinRM, creating a certificate, creating the listener, opening the firewall port and enabling the incoming port on the NSG . You can easily do all that by following my instructions here. From the same post I setup up the encrypted password file and uploaded it to my Function App and set the Function App Application Settings for MIMSyncCredUser and MIMSyncCredPassword.
  • I created an Azure PowerShell Timer Function App. Pretty much the same as I show in this post, except choose Timer.
    • I configured my Schedule for 2330 every night using the following CRON configuration

0 30 23 * * *

  • I set the Azure Function App Timezone to my timezone so that the nightly backup happened at the correct time relative to my timezone. I got my timezone index from here. I set the  following variable in my Azure Function Application Settings to my timezone name AUS Eastern Standard Time.

    WEBSITE_TIME_ZONE

The Function App Script

With all the pre-requisites met, the only thing left is the Function App script itself. Here it is. Update lines 2, 3 & 6 if your variables and password key file are different. The path to your password keyfile will be different on line 6 anyway.

Update line 25 if you want the backups to go somewhere else (maybe a DFS Share).
If your MIM Service Server is not on the same host as your MIM Sync Server change line 59 for the hostname. You’ll need to get the FIM/MIM Automation PS Modules onto your MIM Sync Server too. Details on how to achieve that are here.

Running the Function App I have limited output but enough to see it run. The first part of the script runs very quick. The Export-FIMConfig is what takes the majority of the time. That said less than a minute to get a nice point in time backup that is auto-magically executed nightly. Sorted.

 

Summary

The script itself can be run standalone and you could implement it as a Scheduled Task on your FIM/MIM Server. However I’m using Azure Functions for a number of things and having something that is easily portable and repeatable and centralised with other functions (pun not intended) keeps things organised.

I now have a daily backup of the configurations associated with my development environment. I’m sure this will save me some time in the near future.

Follow Darren on Twitter @darrenjrobinson

 

 

 

Category:
Azure Platform, FIM, Identity and Access Management, PowerShell
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Join the conversation! 5 Comments

  1. Hi
    You do not seem to actually include the backup scripts?
    T

    Reply
    • Lines 43 to 60 perform the backup as shown in the script in the blog post. If you’re not seeing the script trying using a computer to view the post as sometimes the mobile WordPress view doesn’t show the Github Scripts.

      Reply
  2. This is great thanks. I can see why this would be very helpful. I do have some questions on how you would restore this though.

    1) You would import back in the management Agents from the xml files in MAEports – simple
    2) You would copy back in the MAextensions – simple
    3) The question I have is what would you do with all the XML files left in the other two directories?

    I’m fairly new to MIM/FIM and I cannot find similar files on my working servers.

    Reply
    • The full Server Export (all the xml files) are usuful if you want to migrate the entire Sync Server Config to a different Sync Server, or rebuild the Dev Sync Server and quickly restore.

      The Portal xml file needs to be processed by comparing it to the server you may want to update with the same config using the documented Microsoft process.

      Reply
  3. Thanks for the response .

    I found the Microsoft FIM Portal Backup and Restore doc online. I will add both your comment and a reference to that in my documentation.

    Again I appreciate blogs like this as I find Microsoft’s documentation to be a jumbled mess at best or worse overly simplistic.

    Reply

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