Azure API Management Step by Step – Use Cases

jorge-fotoUse Cases

On this second post about Azure API management, let’s discuss about use cases. Why “Use Cases”?                  

Use cases helps to manage complexity, since it focuses on one specific usage aspect at the time. I am grouping and versioning use cases to facilitate your learning process and helping to keep track with future changes. You are welcome to use these diagrams to demonstrate Azure API management features.

API On-boarding is a key aspect of API governance and first thing to be discussed. How can I publish my existing and future APIs back-ends to API Management?

API description formats like Swagger Specification (aka Open API Initiative https://openapis.org/) are fundamental to properly implement automation and devops on your APIM initiative. API can be imported using swagger, created manually or as part of a custom automation/integration process.

Azure API management administrators can group APIs by product allowing subscription workflow. Products visibility are linked with user groups, providing restricted access to APIs. You can manage your API policies as Code thought an exclusive GIT source control repository available to your APIM instance. Secrets and constants used by policies are managed by a key/value(string) service called properties.

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Azure API management platform provides a rich developers portal. Developers can create an account/profile, discover APIs and subscribe to products. API Documentation, multiple language source code samples, console to try APIs, API subscription keys management and Analytics are main features provided. 

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The management and operation of the platform plays an important role on daily tasks. For enterprises, user groups and user(developers) can be fully integrated with Active Directory. Analytics dashboards and reports are available. Email notification and templates are customizable. APIM REST API and powershell commands are available to most of platform features, including exporting analytics reports.

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Security administration use cases groups different configurations. Delegation allows custom development of portal sign-in, sign-up and product subscription. OAuth 2.0 and OpenID providers registration are used by development portal console, when trying APIs, to generate required tokens. Client certificates upload and management are done here or using automation. Developers portal identities configurations brings out of the box integration with social providers. GIT source control settings/management and APIM REST API tokens are available as well.

apim-use-cases-adm-security

Administrators can customize developers portal using built in content management systems functionality. Custom pages and modern javascript development is now allowed. Blogs feature allow of the box blog/post publish/unpublish functionality. Developers submitted applications can be published/unpublished by administrator, to be displayed at developers portal.

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In Summary, Azure API management is a mature and live platform with a few new features under development, bringing a strong integration with Azure Cloud. Click here for RoadMap

In my next post, I will deep dive in API on-boarding strategies.  

Thanks for reading @jorgearteiro

Posts: 1) Introduction  2) Use Cases

Azure API Management Step by Step

jorge-fotoIntroduction

As a speaker and cloud consultant, I have learned and received a lot of feedback about Azure API management platform from customers and community members. I will share some of my learnings in this series of blog posts. Let’s get started!

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APIs – Application programming interfaces are everywhere! They are already part of many companies’ strategies. But how could we consolidate internal and external APIs? How could you productize and monetize them for your company?

We often build APIs to be consumed by a unique application. However, we could also build these APIs to be shared. If you write HTTP APIs around a single and specific business requirement, you can encourage API re-usability and adoption. Bleeding edge technologies like containers and serverless architecture are pushing this approach even further.

API strategy and Governance comes in play to help build a Gateway on top of your APIs. Companies are developing MVPs (minimum viable products) and time to market is fundamental. For example, we do not have time to write authentication, caching and Analytics over and over again.  Azure API management can help you make this happen. apim-consolidation

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This demo API Manegement instance that I created for Kloud solutions illustrates how you could create a unified API endpoint to expose your APIs. Multiple “Services” are published there with a single Authentication layer. If your Email Service back-end implementation uses an external API, like Sendgrid, you can Inject this authentication on the API Management gateway layer, making it transparent for end users.

Azure API management provides a high scalable and multi-regional Gateway that can be deployed on any Azure Region around the world. It is a fully PaaS (platform-as-a-service) API management solution, where you do not have to manage any infrastructure. This, combined with other Azure offerings, like App Services (Web Apps, API Apps, Logic Apps and Functions), provides an Enterprise grade platform to delivery any API strategy.

apim-diagram

Looking this diagram above, we can decouple API Management in 3 main components:

  • Developer Portal – Customizable web site exclusive to your company to allow internal and external developers to engage, discover and consume APIs.
  • Gateway (proxy) – Engine of APIM where Policies can be applied on you inbound, back-end and outbound traffic. It’s very scalable and allows multi-regional deployment, Azure Virtual Network VPN, Azure Active Directory integration and native caching solution. Policies are written in XML and C# expressions to define complex rules like: Rate limit, quota, caching, JWT token validation, Authentication, XML to Json and Json to XML transformations, rewrite URL, CORS, restrict IPs, Set Headers, etc.
  • Administration Portal (aka Publisher Portal) – Administration of your APIM instance can be done via the portal.  Automation and devops teams can use APIM management REST API and/or Powershell commands to fully integrate APIM in your onboarding, build and release processes.

Please keep in mind that this strategy can apply to any environment and architecture where HTTP APIs are exposed, whether they are new microservices or older legacy applications.

Feel free to create an user at https://kloud.portal.azure-api.net, I will try to keep this Azure API Management instance usable for demo purposes only, no guaranties. Then, you can create your own development instance from Azure Portal later.

In my next post, I will talk about API Management use cases and give you a broader view of how deep this platform can go. Click here.

Thanks for reading! @jorgearteiro

Posts: 1) Introduction  2) Use Cases

Enterprise Application platform with Microservices – A Service Fabric perspective

An enterprise application platform can be defined as a suite of products and services that enables development and management of enterprise applications. This platform should be responsible of abstracting complexities related to application development such as diversity of hosting environments, network connectivity, deployment workflows, etc. In a traditional world, applications are monolithic by nature. A monolithic application is composed of many components grouped into multiple tiers bundled together into a single deployable unit. Each tier here can be developed using a specific technology and will have the ability to scale independently. Monolithic application usually persists data in one common data store.

MicroServices - 1

Although a monolithic architecture logically simplifies the application, it introduces many challenges as the number of applications in your enterprise increases. Following are few issues with a monolithic design

  • Scalability – The unit of scale is scoped to a tier. It is not possible to scale bundled within an application tier without scaling the whole tier. This introduces massive resource wastage resulting in increase in operational expense.
  • Reuse and maintenance – The components within an application tier cannot be consumed outside the tier unless exposed as contracts. This forces development teams to replicate code which becomes very difficult to maintain.
  • Updates – As the whole application is one unit of deployment, updating a component will require updating the whole application which may cause downtime thereby affecting the availability of the application.
  • Low deployment density – The compute, storage and network requirements of an application, as a bundled deployable unit may not match the infrastructure capabilities of the hosting machine (VM). This may lead to wastage of shortage of resources.
  • Decentralized management – Due to the redundancy of components across applications, supporting, monitoring and troubleshooting becomes expensive overheads.
  • Data store bottlenecks – If there are multiple components accessing the data store, it becomes the single point of failure. This forces the data store to be highly available.
  • Cloud unsuitable – The hardware dependency of this architecture to ensure availability doesn’t work well with cloud hosting platforms where designing for failure is a core principle.

A solution to this problem is an Application platform based on Microservices architecture. Microservice architecture is a software architecture pattern where applications are composed of small, independent services which can be aggregated using communication channels to achieve an end to end business use case. The services are decoupled from one another in terms of the execution space in which they operate. Each of these services will have the capability to be scaled, tested and maintained separately.

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Microsoft Azure Service Fabric

Service Fabric is a distributed application platform that makes it easy to package, deploy, and manage scalable and reliable Microservices. Following are few advantages of a Service Fabric which makes it the ideal platform to build a Microservice based Application Platform

  • Highly scalable – Every service can be scaled without affecting other services. Service Fabric will support scaling based on VM scale sets which means that these services will have the ability to be auto-scales based on CPU consumption, memory usage, etc.
  • Updates – Services can be updated separately and different versions of a service can be co-deployed to support backward compatibility. Service Fabric also supports automatic rollback during updates to ensure consistency of an application deployment.
  • State redundancy – For state full Microservices, the state can be stored alongside compute for a service. If there are multiple instances of a service running, the state will be replicated for every instance. Service Fabric takes care of replicating the state changes through the stores.
  • Centralized management – The service can be centrally managed, monitored and diagnosed outside application boundaries.
  • High density deployment – Service Fabric supports high density deployment on a virtual machine cluster while ensuring even utilization of resources and distribution of work load.
  • Automatic fault tolerance – The cluster manager of Service Fabric ensures failover and resource balancing in case of a hardware failure. This ensures that your services are cloud ready.
  • Heterogeneous hosting platforms – Service Fabric supports hosting your Microservices across Azure, AWS, On premises or any other datacenter. Cluster manager is capable of managing service deployments with instances spanning multiple datacenters at a time. Apart from Windows, Service Fabric also supports Linux as a host operating system for your micro services.
  • Technology agnostic – Services can be written in any programming language and deployed as executables or hosted within containers. Service Fabric also supports a native Java SDK for Java developers.

Programming models

Service Fabric supports the following four programming models for developing your service:

  • Guest Container – Services packaged into Windows or Linux containers managed by Docker.
  • Guest executables – Services can be packaged as guest executables which are arbitrary executables, written in any language.
  • Reliable Services – An application development framework with fully supported application lifecycle management. Reliable services can be used to develop stateful as well as stateless services and supports transactions.
  • Reliable Actors – A virtual actor based development framework with built-in state management and communication management capabilities. Actor programming model is single threaded and is ideal for hyper scale out scenarios (1000s or instances)

More about Service Fabric programming models can be found here

Service Type

A service type in Service Fabric consists of three components

MicroServices - 3

Code package defines an entry point to the service. This can be an executable or a dynamic linked library. Config package specifies the service configuration for your services and the data package holds static resources like images. Each package can be independently versioned. Service fabric supports upgrade of each of these packages separately. Allocation of a service in a cluster and reallocation of a service on failure are responsibilities of Service Fabric cluster manager. For stateful services, Service Fabric also takes care of replicating the state across multiple instances of a service.

Application Type

A Service Fabric application type is composed of one or more service types.

MicroServices - 4

An application type is a declarative template for creating an application. Service fabric uses application types for packaging, deployment and versioning Microservices.

State stores – Reliable collections

Reliable Collections are highly available, scalable and high performance state store which can be used to store states alongside compute for Microservices. The replication of state and persistence of state on secondary storage is taken care of by the Service Fabric framework. A noticeable difference between Reliable Collections and other high-availability state store (such as cache, tables, queues, etc.) is that the state is kept locally in the service hosting instance while also being made highly available by means of replication. Reliable collections also support transactions and are asynchronous by nature while offering strong consistency.

More about reliable collection can be found here

Management

Service Fabric offers extensive health monitoring capabilities with built-in health status for clusters and services and custom app health reporting. Services are continuously monitored for real-time alerting on problems in production. Performance monitoring overheads are diluted with rich performance metrics for actors and services. Service Fabric analytics is capable of providing repair suggestion thereby supporting preventive healing of services. Custom ETW logs can also be captured for guest executables to ensure centralized logging for all your services. Apart from support for Microsoft tools such as Windows Azure Diagnostics, Operational Insights, Windows Event Viewer and Visual studio diagnostics events viewer, Service Fabric also supports easy integration with third party tools like Kibana and Elastic search as monitoring dashboards.

Conclusion and considerations

Microsoft Service Fabric is potential platform capable of hosting enterprise grade Microservices. Following are few considerations to be aware of while using Service Fabric as your Microservice hosting platform.

  • Choosing a programming model is critical for optimizing the management of Microservices hosted on Service Fabric. Reliable services and Reliable actors are more thickly integrated with the Service Fabric cluster manager compared to guest containers and guest executables.
  • The support for containers on Service Fabric is in an evolving stage. While Windows containers and Hyper-V containers are on the release roadmap, Service Fabric only supports Linux containers as of today.
  • The only two native SDKs supported by Service fabric as of today is based on .net and Java.