First published at https://nivleshc.wordpress.com

Introduction

Wow, it is amazing how time flies. Almost two years ago, I wrote a set of blogs that showed how one can use Azure Resource Manager (ARM) templates and Desired State Configuration (DSC) scripts to deploy an Active Directory Forest automatically.

For those that would like to take a trip down memory lane, here is the link to the blog.

Recently, I have been playing with AWS CloudFormation and I am simply in awe by its power. For those that are not familiar with AWS CloudFormation, it is a tool, similar to Azure Resource Manager, that allows you to “code” your computing infrastructure in Amazon Web Services. Long gone are the days when you would have to sit down, pressing each button and choosing each option to deploy your environment. Cloud computing provides you with a way to interface with the fabric, so that you can script the build of your environment. The benefits of this are enormous. Firstly, it allows you to standardise all your builds. Secondly, it allows you to have a live as-built document (the code is the as-built document). Thirdly, the code is re-useable. Most important of all, since the deployment is now scripted, you can automate it.

In this blog I will show you how to create an AWS CloudFormation template to deploy an AWS Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) Windows Server instance. The template will also include steps to promote the EC2 instance to a Domain Controller in a new Active Directory Forest.

Guess what the best part is? Once the template has been created, all you will have to do is to load it into AWS CloudFormation, provide a few values and sit back and relax. AWS CloudFormation will do everything for you from there on!

Sounds interesting? Lets begin.

Creating the CloudFormation Template

A CloudFormation template starts with a definition of the parameters that will be used. The person running the template (lets refer to them as an operator) will be asked to provide the values for these parameters.

When defining a parameter, you will provide the following

  • a name for the parameter
  • its type
  • a brief description for the parameter so that the operator knows what it will be used for
  • any constraints you want to put on the parameter, for instance
    • a maximum length (for strings)
    • a list of allowed values (in this case a drop down list is presented to the operator, to choose from)
  • a default value for the parameter

For our template, we will use the following parameters.

Next, we will define some mappings. Mappings allow us to define the values for variables, based on what value was provided for a parameter.

When creating EC2 instances, we need to provide a value for the Amazon Machine Image (AMI) to be used. In our case, we will use the OS version to decide which AMI to use.

To find the subnet into which the EC2 instance will be deployed in, we will use the Environment and AvailabilityZone parameters to find it.

The code below defines the mappings we will use

The next section in the CloudFormation template is Resources. This defines all resources that will be created.

If you have any experience deploying Active Directory Forests, you will know that it is extremely simple to do it using PowerShell scripts. Guess what, we will be using PowerShell scripts as well 😉 Now, after the EC2 instance has been created, we need to provide the PowerShell scripts to it, so that it can run them. We will use AWS Simple Storage Service (S3) buckets to store our PowerShell scripts.

To ensure our PowerShell scripts are stored securely, we will allow access to it only via a certain role and policy.

The code below will create an AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) role and policy to access the S3 Bucket where the PowerShell scripts are stored.

We will use cf-init to do all the heavy lifting for us, once the EC2 instance has been created. cf-init is a utility that is present by default in EC2 instances and we can ask it to perform tasks for us.

To trigger cf-init, we will use the Userdata feature of EC2 instance provisioning. cf-init, when started, will check the EC2 Metadata for the credentials it will use, and it will also check it for all the tasks it needs to perform.

Below is the metadata that will be used. For simplicity, I have hardcoded the URL to the files in the S3 bucket.

As you can see, I have first defined the role that cf-init will use to access the S3 bucket. Next, the following tasks will be carried out, in the order defined in the configuration set

  • get-files
    • it will download the files from S3 and place them in the local directory c:\s3-downloads\scripts.
  • configure-instance (the commands in this section are run in alphabetical order, that is why I have prefixed them with a number, to ensure it follows the order I want)
    • It will change the execution policy for PowerShell to unrestricted (please note that this is just for demonstration purposes and the execution policy should not be made this relaxed).
    • next, the name of the server will be changed to what was provided in the Parameters section
    • the following Windows Components will be installed (as defined in the Add-WindowsComponents.ps1 script file)
      • RSAT-AD-PowerShell
      • AD-Domain-Services
      • DNS
      • GPMC
    • the Active Directory Forest will be created, using the Configure-ADForest.ps1 script and the values provided in the Parameters section

In the last part of the CloudFormation template, we will provide the UserData information that will trigger cfn-init to run and do all the configuration. We will also tag the the EC2 instance, based on values from the Parameters section.

For simplicity, I have hardcoded the security group that will be attached to the EC2 instance (this is defined as GroupSet under NetworkInterfaces). You can easily create an additional parameter for this, if you want.

Finally, our template will output the instance’s hostname, environment it has been created in and its privateip. This provides an easy way to identify the EC2 instance once it has been created.

Below is the last part of the template

Now all you have to do is login to AWS CloudFormation, load the template we have created, provide the parameter values and sit back and relax.

AWS CloudFormation will take it from here and do everything for you 😉

How easy was that? Magic 🙂

The complete CloudFormation template is available at https://gist.github.com/nivleshc/867b1a2ca119c7d22cf215b5a9a5de02

The two PowerShell Scripts that are used in the CloudFormation template can be downloaded using the links below

Add-WindowsComponents.ps1

Configure-ADForest.ps1

For anyone deploying an Active Directory Forest in AWS, I hope the above comes in handy.

Enjoy 😉

Category:
Amazon Web Services, PowerShell
Tags:
, , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: