social_engineering
Of the many attacks, hacks and exploits perpetrated against organisations. One of the most common vulnerabilities businesses face and need to guard against is the result of the general goodness or weakness, depending on how you choose to look at it, of our human natures exploited through means of social engineering.

Social engineering is a very common problem in cyber security. It consists of the simple act of getting an individual to unwittingly perform an unsanctioned or undersirable action under false pretenses. Whether granting access to a system, clicking a poisoned link, revealing sensitive information or any other improperly authorised action. The act relies on the trusting nature of human beings, their drive to help and work with one another. All of which makes social engineering hard to defend against and detect.

Some of the better known forms of social engineering include:

Phishing

Phishing is a technique of fraudulently obtaining private information. Typically, the phisher sends an e-mail that appears to come from a legitimate business—a bank, or credit card company—requesting “verification” of information and warning of some dire consequence if it is not provided. The e-mail usually contains a link to a fraudulent web page that seems legitimate—with company logos and content—and has a form requesting everything from a home address to an ATM card’s PIN or a credit card number. [Wikipedia]

Tailgating

An attacker, seeking entry to a restricted area secured by unattended, electronic access control, e.g. by RFID card, simply walks in behind a person who has legitimate access. Following common courtesy, the legitimate person will usually hold the door open for the attacker or the attackers themselves may ask the employee to hold it open for them. The legitimate person may fail to ask for identification for any of several reasons, or may accept an assertion that the attacker has forgotten or lost the appropriate identity token. The attacker may also fake the action of presenting an identity token. [Wikipedia]

Baiting

Baiting is like the real-world Trojan horse that uses physical media and relies on the curiosity or greed of the victim. In this attack, attackers leave malware-infected floppy disks, CD-ROMs, or USB flash drives in locations people will find them (bathrooms, elevators, sidewalks, parking lots, etc.), give them legitimate and curiosity-piquing labels, and waits for victims. For example, an attacker may create a disk featuring a corporate logo, available from the target’s website, and label it “Executive Salary Summary Q2 2012”. The attacker then leaves the disk on the floor of an elevator or somewhere in the lobby of the target company. An unknowing employee may find it and insert the disk into a computer to satisfy his or her curiosity, or a good Samaritan may find it and return it to the company. In any case, just inserting the disk into a computer installs malware, giving attackers access to the victim’s PC and, perhaps, the target company’s internal computer network. [Wikipedia]

Water holing

Water holing is a targeted social engineering strategy that capitalizes on the trust users have in websites they regularly visit. The victim feels safe to do things they would not do in a different situation. A wary person might, for example, purposefully avoid clicking a link in an unsolicited email, but the same person would not hesitate to follow a link on a website he or she often visits. So, the attacker prepares a trap for the unwary prey at a favored watering hole. This strategy has been successfully used to gain access to some (supposedly) very secure systems. [Wikipedia]

Quid pro quo

Quid pro quo means something for something. An attacker calls random numbers at a company, claiming to be calling back from technical support. Eventually this person will hit someone with a legitimate problem, grateful that someone is calling back to help them. The attacker will “help” solve the problem and, in the process, have the user type commands that give the attacker access or launch malware. [Wikipedia]

Now do something about it!

As threats to orginisation’s cyber security go. Social engineering is a significant and prevalent threat, and not to be under-estimated.

However the following are some of the more effective means of guarding against it.

  1. Be vigilent…
  2. Be vigilent over the phone, through email and online.
  3. Be healthily skeptical and aware of your surroundings.
  4. Always validate the requestor’s identity before considering their request.
  5. Validate the request against another member of staff if necessary.

Means of mitigating social engineering attacks:

  1. Use different logins for all resources.
  2. Use multi-factor authentication for all sensitive resources.
  3. Monitor account usage.

Means of improving your staff’s ability to detect social engineering attacks:

  1. Educate your staff.
  2. Run social engineering simulation exercises across your organisation.

Ultimately of course the desired outcome of trying to bolster your’s organisation’s ability to detect a social engineering attack. Is a situation where the targeted user isn’t fooled by the attempt against their trust and performs accordingly, such as knowing not to click the link in an email purporting to help them retrieve their lost banking details for example.

Some additional tips:

  1. Approach all unsolicited communications no matter who the originator claims to be with skepticism.
  2. Pay close attention to the target URL of all links by hovering your cursor over them to hopefully reveal their true destination.
  3. Look to the HTTPS digital certificate of all sensitive websites you visit for identity information.
  4. Use spam filtering, Antivirus software and anti-phising software.
Category:
Security
Tags:
, ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: