IT Service Management (ITSM) & Operations – Overview of the Availability Management Process

Background

In many cases ITSM Availability Management Process is overlooked due to other frontline processes such as incident, problem and change management. I have provided a summary of this availability management process and significance below. I hope that the information is useful for your organisation in order to define and implement the process.
Objectives:

  • Availability management has to ensure that the delivered availability levels for all services comply with or exceed the agreed requirements in a cost-effective way and enables the business to satisfy its objectives.
  • Provide a range of IT Availability reporting to ensure that agreed levels of Availability, reliability and maintainability are measured and monitored on an ongoing basis.
  • Create and maintain a forward looking Availability Plan aimed at improving the overall Availability of IT Services and Infrastructure components to ensure existing and future business Availability requirements can be satisfied.

Scope:

  • Designing, implementing, measuring, managing and improving IT services and the components that are used to provide them.
  • Services and processes:
  • Business processes
  • Future business plans and requirements
  • Service objectives, current Service Operation and delivery
  • IT infrastructure, data, applications and the environment
  • Priorities of the business in relation to the services

Industry Good Practice for this Process

Avialability mgt process.jpg
Availability management is part of service design and it is one of the critical process because the reliability of a service or component indicates how long it can perform its agreed function without interruption.

Activities – Reactive (Executed in the operational phase of the lifecycle)

  • Monitoring, measuring, analysing and reporting availability of services and components
  • Unavailability analysis
  • Expanded lifecycle of the incidents
  • Service Failure Analysis (SFA)

Activities – Proactive (Executed in the design phase of the lifecycle)

  • Identifying Vital Business Functions (VBFs)
  • Designing for availability
  • Component Failure Impact Analysis (CFIA)
  • Single Point of Failure (SPOF) analysis
  • Fault Tree Analysis (FTA)
  • Risk Analysis and Management
  • Availability Test Schemes
  • Planned and preventive maintenance
  • Production of Projected Service Availability (PSA document
  • Continuous reviewing and improvement

Inputs/Outputs

Inputs:

  • Business information, organisation strategy, financial information and plans
  • Current and future requirements of IT services
  • Risk analysis
  • Business impact analysis
  • Service portfolio and service catalogue from service level management process
  • Change calendars and release management information

Outputs:

  • Availability management information systems (AMIS)
  • Availability plan
  • Availability and restore criteria
  • Reports on the availability, reliability and maintainability of services

Summary

In summary, ITSM Availability Management measures three important aspects: how long a service can perform without interruption (Reliability), how quickly a service can be restored when it has failed (Maintainability) and how effectively a third party supplier deliver their services (Serviceability). These three aspects are key performance measures in ITSM availability management. Availability Management has to be discussed at the design phase of IT Service Management. Hope you found the above information useful. Thanks

IaaS Application Migration – Go Live Decision Responsibility Model, High Level Run Sheet and Change Management Life Cycle

Go Live Decision Responsibility Model

A go-live decision model helps to assign accountability to key project stakeholders in order to make decision to proceed with go-live on an agreed date or not. Below is an example responsibility model that will guide to create a required decision responsibility model.
Decision.jpg

High Level Run Sheet

run sheet is a list of procedures or events organised in progressive sequence to execute the required agreed outcome. Below sheet is an example that can be used as part of application migration to cloud.
run sheet.jpg

Change Management Life Cycle

The objective of change management in this context is to ensure that standardised methods and procedures are used for efficient and prompt handling of all changes to control IT infrastructure, in order to minimise the number and impact of any related incidents upon service (ITSM Best Practice).
In this context, below is a simple change management practice model that can be used to control all changes to IT infrastructure in an IaaS application migration.
change mgt.jpg

Summary

Hope you found these examples useful for your application migration to assist and complete transition.
 

Cloud Operations – Key Service Operation Principles – Consideration

Below are some good IT Service Management Operational Principles to consider when migrating applications into Cloud.  These will help to align your operational goals and organisation’s strategic initiatives.

Principle #1

Organisation’s IT Service Management will govern and lead all IT services utilising strategic processes and technology enablers based on industry best practices.

Implications / Outcomes

  • The selected process and technology will be fit for purpose
  • Suppliers and Service Partners will be required to integrate with strategic processes and technologies
  • Process re-engineering including training will be required
  • Everyone uses or integrates with a central platform
  • Process efficiency through effective process integration
  • Reduced operating cost
  • Ensures contestability of services for Organisation

Principle #2

Contestability between IT Service providers is a key outcome for service management across IT@Organisation, where it does not have a negative impact on the customer experience.

Implications / Outcomes

  • Avoid vendor lock-in
  • Requires strategic platforms
  • Sometimes greater complexity
  • More ownership of process by Organisation
  • Better cost outcomes through competition
  • Improved performance, incumbent advantage is earned
  • Access to innovation
  • Access to capacity

Principle #3

The Organisation’s IT operating model will be based on the principles of Customer-centricity (Organisation’s business and IT), consistency and quality of service and continual improvement of process maturity.

Implications / Outcomes

  • More extensive process integration
  • Possible constraints – cost, time, resources, agility
  • Additional internal expertise
  • Governance as a focal point
  • Continual improvement
  • Improved process alignment with business alignment
  • Quantitative, demonstrable benefits
  • Improved customer satisfaction

Principle #4

Organisation will retain and own all IP for Organisation’s Service Management knowledge assets and processes.

Implications / Outcomes

  • Strong asset, capacity, knowledge management
  • Service provider governance
  • Improved internal capability
  • Service provider independence
  • Reduced risk
  • Exploitation of skills and experience gained
  • Encourage self-healing culture

Principle #5

Changes to existing Organisation processes and procedures will only be made where those changes are necessary to deliver benefits from the Cloud platform.

Implications / Outcomes

  • Vendors adapt to Organisation’s processes
  • Existing process needs to be critically assessed
  • Reduced exposure to risk
  • Reduced levels of disruption
  • Faster adoption of new processes through familiarity
  • Faster Implementation due to less change

Principle #6

Before beginning process design, ownership of the process and its outcomes, resource availability, cost benefit analysis and performance measurements will be defined and agreed.

Implications / Outcomes

  • Ownership of process is known
  • The process is appropriately resourced
  • Alignment of activities with desired outcomes
  • Improved process effectiveness
  • Reduced risk of failure
  • Resourcing cost

 

Summary

Please note that there will be practical implications to organisation’s service management processes (typically – incident management, problem management, capacity management, service restoration, change management, configuration management and release management). Also these are some of the good principles to consider and can be customised as per organisational strategy and priorities.
 

Cloud Operations Model and Project Stream – Considerations

Background

Cloud operations stream is responsible for designing and operation of the cloud model for the project and BAU activities. This stream is primarily responsible for people, process, tools and information. The model can change as the organisation’s requirements and type of business.  

Aspects Cloud Operations Model

Below is an example of key aspects that we need to consider when defining Cloud Operations Model.
aspects 2.jpg

Cloud Operations Stream  – High Level Approach

Below is an example model for how to track a cloud program operationally.
track ops cloud.jpg

Cloud Operations Stream – Governance

Below is an example model for cloud operations stream governance, which can be used to guide the operations stream.
Cloud ops Gov.jpg

Summary 

Hope you found some of these aspects and considerations mentioned above is useful. Thanks

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