What if you wanted to leverage Azure automation to analyse database entries and send some statistics or even reports on a daily or weekly basis?

Well why would you want to do that?

  • On demand compute:
    • You may not have access to a physical server. Or your computer isn’t powerful enough to handle huge data processing. Or you would definitely do not want to wait in the office for the task to complete before leaving on a Friday evening.
  • You pay by the minute
    • With Azure automation, your first 500 minutes are for free, then you pay by the minute. Check out Azure Automation Pricing for more details. By the way its super cheap.
  • Its Super Cool doing it with PowerShell. 

There are other reasons why would anyone use Azure automation but we are not getting into the details around that. What we want to do is to leverage PowerShell to do such things. So here it goes!

To query against a SQL database whether its in Azure or not isn’t that complex. In fact this part of the post is to just get us started. Now for this part, we’re going to do something simple because if you want to get things done, you need the fastest way of doing it. And that is what we are going to do. But here’s a quick summary for the ways I thought of doing it:

    1. Using ‘invoke-sqlcmd2‘. This Part of the blog.. its super quick and easy to setup and it helps getting things done quickly.
    2. Creating your own SQL Connection object to push complex SQL Querying scenarios. [[ This is where the magic kicks in.. Part 2 of this series ]]

How do we get this done quickly?

For the sake of keeping things simple, we’re assuming the following:

  • We have an Azure SQL Database called ‘myDB‘, inside an Azure SQL Server ‘mytestAzureSQL.database.windows.net‘.
  • Its a simple database containing a single table ‘test_table’. This table has basically three columns  (Id, Name, Age) and this table contains only two records.
  • We’ve setup ‘Allow Azure Services‘ Access on this database in the firewall rules Here’s how to do that just in case:
    • Search for your database resource.
    • Click on ‘Set firewall rules‘ from the top menu.
    • Ensure the option ‘Allow Azure Services‘ is set to ‘ON
  • We do have an Azure automation account setup. We’ll be using that to test our code.

Now lets get this up and running

Start by creating two variables, one containing the SQL server name and the other containing the database name.

Then create an Automation credential object to store your SQL Login username and password. You need this as you definitely should not be thinking of storing your password in plain text in script editor.

I still see people storing passwords in plain text inside scripts.

Now you need to import the ‘invoke-sqlcmd2‘ module in the automation account. This can be done by:

  • Selecting the modules tab from the left side options in the automation account.
  • From the top menu, click on Browse gallery, search for the module ‘invoke-sqlcmd2‘, click on it and hit ‘Import‘. It should take about a minute to complete.

Now from the main menu of the automation account, click on the ‘Runbooks‘ tab and then ‘Add a Runbook‘, Give it a name and use ‘PowerShell‘ as the type. Now you need to edit the runbook. To do that, click on the Pencil icon from the top menu to get into the editing pane.

Inside the pane, paste the following code. (I’ll go through the details don’t worry).

#Import your Credential object from the Automation Account
 
 $SQLServerCred = Get-AutomationPSCredential -Name "mySqllogin" #Imports your Credential object from the Automation Account
 
 #Import the SQL Server Name from the Automation variable.
 
 $SQL_Server_Name = Get-AutomationVariable -Name "AzureSQL_ServerName" #Imports the SQL Server Name from the Automation variable.
 
 #Import the SQL DB from the Automation variable.
 
 $SQL_DB_Name = Get-AutomationVariable -Name "AzureSQL_DBname"
    • The first cmdlet ‘Get-AutomationPSCredential‘ is to retrieve the automation credential object we just created.
    • The next two cmdlets ‘Get-AutomationVariable‘ are to retrieve the two Automation variables we just created for the SQL server name and the SQL database name.

Now lets query our database. To do that, paste the below code after the section above.

#Query to execute
 
 $Query = "select * from Test_Table"
 
 "----- Test Result BEGIN "
 
 # Invoke to Azure SQL DB
 
 invoke-sqlcmd2 -ServerInstance "$SQL_Server_Name" -Database "$SQL_DB_Name" -Credential $SQLServerCred -Query "$Query" -Encrypt
 
 "`n ----- Test Result END "

So what did we do up there?

    • We’ve created a simple variable that contains our query. I know the query is too simple but you can put in there whatever you want.
    • We’ve executed the cmdlet ‘invoke-sqlcmd2‘. Now if you noticed, we didn’t have to import the module we’ve just installed, Azure automation takes care of that upon every execution.
    • In the cmdlet parameter set, we specified the SQL server (that has been retrieved from the automation variable), and the database name (automation variable too). Now we used the credential object we’ve imported from Azure automation. And finally, we used the query variable we also created. An optional switch parameter ‘-encypt’ can be used to encrypt the connection to the SQL server.

Lets run the code and look at the output!

From the editing pane, click on ‘Test Pane‘ from the menu above. Click on ‘Start‘ to begin testing the code, and observe the output.

Initially the code goes through the following stages for execution

  • Queuing
  • Starting
  • Running
  • Completed

Now what’s the final result? Look at the black box and you should see something like this.

----- Test Result BEGIN 

Id Name Age
-- ---- ---
 1 John  18
 2 Alex  25

 ----- Test Result END 

Pretty sweet right? Now the output we’re getting here is an object of type ‘Datarow‘. If you wrap this query into a variable, you can start to do some cool stuff with it like

$Result.count or

$Result.Age or even

$Result | where-object -Filterscript {$PSItem.Age -gt 10}

Now imagine if you could do so much more complex things with this.

Quick Hint:

If you include a ‘-debug’ option in your invoke cmdlet, you will see the username and password in plain text. Just don’t run this code with debugging option ON 🙂

Stay tuned for Part 2!!

 

Category:
Azure Infrastructure, Azure Platform, DevOps, Managed Services, PowerShell
Tags:
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